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    Author Topic: Ancient Sources Quotes on Field Fortifications  (Read 3530 times)
    JKALER48
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    I am the last one on the right!


    « on: December 03, 2009, 10:19:36 PM »

    BRIDGES

    "caes.gal.6.29":    [6.29] Caesar, after he discovered through the Ubian scouts that the Suevi had retired into their woods, apprehending a scarcity of corn, because, as we have observed above, all the Germans pay very little attention to agriculture, resolved not to proceed any further; but, that he might not altogether relieve the barbarians from the fear of his return, and that he might delay their succors, having led back his army, he breaks down, to the length of 200 feet, the further end of the bridge, which joined the banks of the Ubii, and at the extremity of the bridge raises towers of four stories, and stations a guard of twelve cohorts for the purpose of defending the bridge, and strengthens the place with considerable fortifications.

    [
    SEIGE WORKS/Harbor Defense and Attack

    "caes.civ.1.25":    [1.25] Having delivered this message he marched to Brundusium with six legions, four of them veterans: the rest those which he had raised in the late levy and completed on his march, for he had sent all Domitius's cohorts immediately from Corfinium to Sicily. He discovered that the consuls were gone to Dyrrachium with a considerable part of the army, and that Pompey remained at Brundusium with twenty cohorts; but could not find out, for a certainty, whether Pompey staid behind to keep possession of Brundusium, that he might the more easily command the whole Adriatic sea, with the extremities of Italy and the coast of Greece, and be able to conduct the war on either side of it, or whether he remained there for want of shipping; and, being afraid that Pompey would come to the conclusion that he ought not to relinquish Italy, he determined to deprive him of the means of communication afforded by the harbor of Brundusium. The plan of his work was as follows: Where the mouth of the port was narrowest he threw up a mole of earth on either side, because in these places the sea was shallow. Having gone out so far that the mole could not be continued in the deep water, he fixed double floats, thirty feet on either side, before the mole. These he fastened with four anchors at the four corners, that they might not be carried away by the waves. Having completed and secured them, he then joined to them other floats of equal size. These he covered over with earth and mold, that he might not be prevented from access to them to defend them, and in the front and on both sides he protected them with a parapet of wicker work; and on every fourth one raised a turret, two stories high, to secure them the better from being attacked by the shipping and set on fire.

    "caes.civ.1.26":    [1.26] To counteract this, Pompey fitted out large merchant ships, which he found in the harbor of Brundusium: on them he erected turrets three stories high, and, having furnished them with several engines and all sorts of weapons, drove them among Caesar's works, to break through the floats and interrupt the works; thus there happened skirmishes every day at a distance with slings, arrows, and other weapons.

    Vitr. 1.5.3: (on binding and reinforcing the outer and inner walls of a defensive circuit): timbers of charred olive wood should be frequently placed [transversely] in order that both facades of the wall as if connected by pins...may have everlasting strength. For such timber cannot be injured by decay, weather or age.

    « Last Edit: September 03, 2013, 02:30:22 PM by JKALER48 » Logged

    Macedon
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    « Reply #1 on: May 18, 2011, 10:48:07 AM »

    One honest question guys, since I am new to this forum, what is the exact timeframe of interest? Do we want sources about later Roman camps (as in what is commonly known as Byzantine years?).
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    M. Demetrius
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    « Reply #2 on: May 18, 2011, 11:51:51 AM »

    I'm interested in that.  I've been in the 1st Century BC/AD for longer, but have lately gotten interested in the 4th.  By then, what we now call the Byzantine was in budding stage, at least.  What do you have you'd like to start up a discussion on?
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    David Wills
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    « Reply #3 on: May 18, 2011, 02:25:46 PM »

    I have very interesting texts from works such as Sylloge Tacticorum, De Re Militari or De Re Strategica and others. I just have them in Greek in the original text. English translations exist like by Dennis, I just have not seen any in digital form. I could post the relevant original Greek text easily if you think it could be useful for those who know ancient (or medieval) Greek or even scan some pages with English translations thereof. It is the fact that they are about Roman camps of later centuries (6th-10th) that worried me most, regarding the focus of this forum. If it is OK, I will provide you with the material I have.
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    M. Demetrius
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    « Reply #4 on: May 20, 2011, 02:56:45 PM »

    It's possible that somebody on the forum knows Greek, but I am not that someone.  It would be an English translation that would be useful to me.
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